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  • CITIZENSFor Kenyan school pupils/familiesAvailable: 15 seats
  • Non ResidentsFor expats (Non Residents)Available: 18 seats

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Zoom Out Science Class in the Wild

0
  • Educational trip and immersive experience for kids
  • Available over the weekends and weekdays upon request
  • Nairobi National Park

One of our products is the citizen science program which is under Turnup for Good to deliver impact themed storytelling and conservation themed safaris for photography and wildlife education to create awareness and nurture kids to be champions of conservation. It is an opportunity for kids to learn, enjoy a game drive and of course contribute to conservation both directly and as an ambassador. The ideal age group: 7 years – 13 years but we can tailor it for kids below 7 or above 13. It can also be offered exclusively to families or tailored for schools.

The frequently asked questions
1. Capacity: We are currently using a 4 by 4 open roof Toyota Hiace vans which can seat six at the back, driver and a co-driver seat reserved for a parent, teacher or Turnup.Travel representative.
If you book for six kids, you get a complimentary seat. Six is a good number for quality learning as kids are playful and cheeky.
2. Timings: We have a morning or afternoon game drive from 8am to 12 noon and 1pm to 5pm.
Not too early (wake up time), they eat at home and for afternoon, they’ll be home by 5pm to shower before curfew.
Our driver guide will arrive 15 minutes before the set departure time (7:45 am and 12:45pm). Mzungu
time.
3. Space: We have implemented physical distancing onboard so every kid has a window seat for uninterrupted game viewing and no one seating at the middle seat. Vehicles are cleaned and sanitized after every game drive to the highest hygiene standards. You can inspect the vehicles and report to us.

The driver will ensure the kids have their masks on during the safari as recommended by Ministry of Health. Kenya Wildlife Service has a handwashing station and temperature check at the gate too.

The science class: It is a three-hour game drive

We will start with the history of the park and its attractions. Nairobi National Park is the first park to be gazetted in Kenya on December 16, 1946 and the only wildlife park in the world that is so close to the city. It has an orphanage, safari walk and game park itself. We will be doing a game drive in the park (no tour of the orphanage & safari walk)

What do we expect to see?

We will share key attractions but no game drive is similar in terms of sightings and that is the beauty of nature. Kids have to be attentive to learn. Nairobi National Park is a major rhino sanctuary for breeding and restocking other parks. Has over 400 bird species. At least 20 of which are seasonal European migrants

It has large predators like the lion, leopard, hyena and cheetah. 4/5 of the big five. We will also explain why elephants aren’t resident to Nairobi National Park because of human wildlife conflict and the ivory burning site as a significant event to fight against poaching

Aggregations of large herbivores- eland, buffalo, zebra and wildebeest. The park is home to over 100 mammal species and has a wildebeest and zebra migration.

Zoom out: Learning in progress
There will be no expectations of them to memorize any information and the sole objective here is to deliver a safari that is fun and educational from stories and fascinating facts to embed within them a seed to love nature, educates and introduces them to contemporary issues relating to what they are seeing. The idea is to give the kids great talking points to discuss with your family and peers so it’ll be good to ask “What did you learn or see”?

What happens during the game drive?
We have well calibrated binoculars and we’ll show them how to use for game viewing.
As we spot animals, our knowledgeable driver guide will talk about it in the following ways.

What’s the name, classification (is it an herbivore, omnivore or carnivore), it’s family, difference between male and female in terms of appearance and behaviour as well as role and their habitat and what they’re called if in a group. Like a pride of lions, a herd of buffaloes, a tower of giraffes and flock of ostriches. The driver guide will pause to ask if they’re any questions and if none, we will have simple cues or questions to emphasize what they’re learning and keep them engaged. We’ll tell them their names in Swahili or use Lion King references with relatability to their level of knowledge to spark interest and discovery. Our drivers are good with kids and great storytellers. It’ll be fun!

Key places to stop
1. Gate: We’ll check if kids want to use the bathroom before we proceed to the park
2. Ivory burning site – talk to the about the event, significance and poaching crisis
3. Drive by the dams in the park to see hippos and crocodiles as well as birds
4. Another bathroom break at the picnic site next to Hippo Pools and here we’ll show them the skulls of different animals for them to identify as you share some facts.
5. Show them the plaque with the conservation heroes – rangers who died while on duty protecting what they’ve experienced in the park. They can again use the bathroom again before we head home or shop at the gift shop (maybe buy a book, souvenir or take photos) for memories.

Photography rules and spots
While we like photos of our happy clients and to keep memories, we will always seek your consent before photographing minors and offer to help them take photos. We can do this at the KWS gate, Conservation Heroes plaque, at the picnic site with the skulls and on safari. We will also share these photos with you via Whatsapp.

We will ensure the kids have masks ON and 1 metre apart.

END OF EXPERIENCE
After 3 hours, we will drop back home. The trip doesn’t include any stops like at the mall.
WHAT TO BRING
Pack their snacks (fruits are good solid food and healthy). Recommended for them to eat breakfast or lunch at home before the safari. African mums taught us there’s food at home.

A notebook and pen
Camera if the kids can use to practice wildlife photography as well.
We’ll provide mineral water at room temperature
Bring your ID or passport (for the adults)
COST: Ksh 2500 for Kenyan citizens. Including transport and park fees for kids.
Other events and partnerships
We’ve previously taken the Homeless of Nairobi kids to the park in partnership with KWS for their
Children for Wildlife programme and partnered with KWS for conservation fun day.


Photos link: https://tinyurl.com/y8olrgq6

Package Inclusive of

  • Park Fees for citizens and kids below 17 years
  • Services of an English Speaking Driver Guide
  • A 3-6 hour game drive
  • Pick up and drop off from home/ school for a minimum six pax
  • A Toyota Landcruiser
  • Soft Drinks and wine
  • We have well calibrated binoculars and we’ll show them how to use for game viewing
  • Photography
Photos
Itinerary

Assembly at City Market / pick up from home07:45 hours

08:30 hours/ 1:30pmArrive at Nairobi National for 3 hour game drive

We will start with the history of the park and its attractions. Nairobi National Park is the first park to be
gazetted in Kenya on December 16, 1946 and the only wildlife park in the world that is so close to the
city. It has an orphanage, safari walk and game park itself. We will be doing a game drive in the park (no
tour of the orphanage & safari walk)
What do we expect to see? We will share key attractions but no game drive is similar in terms of
sightings and that is the beauty of nature. Kids have to be attentive to learn.
Nairobi National Park is a major rhino sanctuary for breeding and restocking other parks
Has over 400 bird species. At least 20 of which are seasonal European migrants

1pm: Drop off

Key places to stop
1. Gate: We’ll check if kids want to use the bathroom before we proceed to the park
2. Ivory burning site – talk to the about the event, significance and poaching crisis
3. Drive by the dams in the park to see hippos and crocodiles as well as birds
4. Another bathroom break at the picnic site next to Hippo Pools and here we’ll show them the
skulls of different animals for them to identify as you share some facts.
5. Show them the plaque with the conservation heroes – rangers who died while on duty
protecting what they’ve experienced in the park. They can again use the bathroom again before
we head home or shop at the gift shop (maybe buy a book, souvenir or take photos) for
memories.

Map